Sunday, May 10, 2015

Second Street Station: A Mary Handley Mystery by Lawrence H. Levy

Mary Handley is everything she shouldn't be in the times she lives.  She's outspoken, smart, has her own opinions and has quick comebacks for anyone who dares put her down.  Her mother is despairing.  How will she ever find a husband acting like that?  Who said Mary wanted a husband?

Broadway Books and Edelweiss gave me the opportunity to read this book for review (thank you).  It will be published June 9th.

Mary has been fired from her job at the factory because she wouldn't kowtow to the lady manager.  She hated the job, but needed the money.  When her good friend up above her in the apartments announcing she's getting married, Mary is happy for her.  The happiness is short-lived because the potential husband is shot and killed.  When Mary goes to check out the crime scene, she argues with the old cop there that it is NOT suicide.  The police chief asks her why; she explains.  The coroner agrees with her. The chief is impressed but he can't hire a woman.

There's a problem, though.  Women are protesting and the chief's supervisors tell him to put a woman on the case.  That should quiet them down.  They don't care if she's wrong, hurt or killed.  They just want to stop the protesting. Mary knows she working against all odds, but she's also facing her dream and she's going to do her best.

The author mixed in fact as well as fiction and there are some big names in this story:  J P Morgan, Edison, and Tesla.  They are competing with each other and are willing to steal or, in some cases, kill to get what they want.

There's a bit everything in this tale, all pertaining to the late 1800's.    Mr. Levy takes Mary through every emotion she's ever had, things are twisted and perverted, and her friends desert her, and he still keeps her standing strong.

This was an interesting read  I wasn't sure about having so many famous characters it it, but Mr. Levy makes them human and fallible as well as exposing their true characters.  It added to the story.  So does the bit of history that is shown at the back.  Not all of this story is fiction.

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